Cities

Many of Poland`s villages, towns and cities shelter rich cultural heritage that has survived all the battles fought on the polish soil through centuries. Such cities as Wroclaw, Warsaw, Krakow, Poznan, Torun or Gdansk can offer treasures of architecture and art that you don`t even suspect.

warsaw
Warsaw
Wroclaw
Wroclaw
Krakow
Kraków
Gdańsk
Gdańsk
Zakopane
Zakopane
Toruń
Toruń
Poznań
Poznań
Kazimierz
Kazimierz Dolny

Warsaw

For the past four centuries, Warsaw has been the capital of Poland, with the heroic Mermaid in the city's coat of arms. It is situated in the very heart of Europe, upon the Vistula River, and inhabited by 1.7 million people. Nowadays, the lively metropolis is the political, economic, and cultural centre of the country, combining dramatic history and rich traditions with dynamic modernity. Newcomers are astonished by its diversity, moved by its tragic past, and fascinated by its unique atmosphere.

Wroclaw

The fourth largest city in Poland, Wroclaw, in spite of having many gems to offer to the traveler, still represents an ‘off-the-beaten track ’ choice of destination. Those who do end up visiting this beautiful metropolis, with an ancient history, realize instantly that Wroclaw is in fact a ‘must-see’ destination. It has a delightful city center, lush parks, wide-ranging choice of restaurants and hotels and a vibrant night life. Moespecially welcoming, which is sure to make a visit to this historic city even more memorable. Main attractions: old market place (Gothic town hall and an impressive ensemble of buildings whose facades range from Gothic to art nouveau), Ostrow Tumski, Ostrow Tumski bridge, Panorama Raclawika, Cathedral of John the Baptist & the Japanese Garden. www.wroclaw.com

Kraków

Sitting on the banks of the Vistula, Kraków is famous for its priceless historical monuments of culture and art. It’s here that legends, history and modernity intertwine. Its center is on UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list. Kraków boasts the largest medieval Market Square in Europe. A city, which never sleeps. There is always something interesting going on in Kraków.

Gdańsk

Along the Amber Coast – Poland’s gateway to the sea. For centuries ships from all over the world have moored at Gdańsk waterfront, turning it into a prosperous, wealthy city. Home of the Solidarity movement that led the Polish people to freedom.

Zakopane

Zakopane is Poland's best-known mountain resort - Zakopane a fascinating town – Poland’s winter capital, nestled at the foot of the Tatras Mountains, A city which attracts skiers, trekkers, hikers and those who seek spiritual restas well.

Toruń

Torun, perched on the banks of the Vistula River, was founded in 1233 by the Teutonic Order and was part of the Hanseatic League, which led to its rapid economic growth and expansion in the 14th century. As the conflicts developed between Poland and the Teutonic knights toward the end of that century, the majority of the city's inhabitants took Poland's side. Following the second Peace of Torun in 1466, Poland regained the entire Chelmno region, including Torun itself. The city flourished once again in the second half of the 16th century, when it became one of Poland's major centers of learning. Among other things, Torun was the birthplace of the astronomer Nicolas Copernicus. Torun's Old Town contains a huge collection of gothic architecture, much of which dates back to the Teutonic Period. The most notable examples include the Town Hall, the Church of the Sacred Virgin Mary, the parish church of St. John's and fragments of the town walls, incorporating gateways and the Guard Tower.

Poznań

Known worldwide for its International Trade Fair, Poznan is the capital of the area known as Greater Poland. It has traditionally attracted businessmen, scientists and industrialists from allover. The city numbers many landmarks of interest to tourists as well. As in many other leading destinations, the focal point is the city's Old Town, where visitors can spend many hours exploring the Renaissance city hall, the Przemyslaw, the Fara Palaces and the many art museums, as well as Ostrow Tumski, an island set between the Warta and Cybina rivers, home to the gothic cathedral of St. Peter and Paul with its ring of 15 chapels. The Henryk Wieniawski Violin Festival is held in the city annually. Surrounding Poznan are lakes and verdant forests, historic palaces in Kornik and Rogalin, and Gniezno, the country's first capital, where Polish history is said to have begun. www.city.poznan.pl

Kazimierz Dolny

The town of Kazimierz Dolny, situated on the Lublin plateau, lies on the right bank of the river Vistula on its way to the Baltic. Because of its attractive position, its rich history, its picturesque medieval houses, wonderful architecture and kind climate, Kazimierz is known not only in Poland but also abroad as a sought after tourist center where guests can relax and enjoy their holidays. In the town centre around the market place and the adjacent streets, visitors can admire the renaissance buildings. From the "Baszta" /or Tower/ , the ruins of the castle, and the "Hill of the Three Crosses", one can enjoy a panoramic view of the town, which fits in so well into the overall natural countryside and forms a harmonized entity. During the holiday season a number of performances take place such as the all Polish festival of orchestras and folk singers, concerts in the Parish Church, a vintage car rally, a film and art festival, a students`song festival and many other activites of a cultural-artistic character.